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Life Safety Boxes

safety logoIntended for emergency personnel.
Only immediately life threatening dangers are on front.
Do not mess with please.

 

life safety box The "boxes" are in one location per building:

   Agassiz - in hallway near room 7 
   Blinks - in main lab near door to room 106
   Boatworks - in dive locker area on bulletin board
   DeNault - in downstairs hallway opposite stairs
   Loeb - in hallway near room 19 [Master LSB inside room 19]
   Fisher - in room 14 near fire alarm system
   Shop - in room 3 attached to cabinet

Inside a LIFE SAFETY BOX

  • Hazard Code Guide - hazards are identified by a code system, this decodes the numbers.

  • Map with storage sites - shows were in each lab the hazardous material is stored.

  • Notification List - who would best know about conditions and materials in the lab.

  • Chemical Inventory - actual list of chemicals present, hazardous and non- haz.

Trigger amounts for front panel haz stickers:

To get a "sticker" on the front of the Life Safety Box requires the total quantity of that hazard to exceed the amount listed to the left. Not having a sticker means that there is less than this amount.
There may still be significant hazards in the lab, even though there is no sticker.
>>>>> Always use caution when entering a lab you do not know. (and even ones you do!)
compressed gas   (1 cu. ft.)
severe poison    (1pt / 1lb)
moderate poison  (1gal / 8lbs)
water reactive   (1gal / 8lbs)
oxidizer         (1gal / 8lbs)
flammable        (5gal / 40lbs)
corrosive        (5gal / 40lbs)
radioactive      (Level A)
biohazard        (Level 2 or up)
other hazards    (as appropriate)
non-hazardous    (if alone)

Chemical Storage Groups

Keeping incompatible chemicals separate prevents dangerous combinations during a fire or earthquake.

IT IS IMPORTANT TO FOLLOW THE STORAGE GROUPS!

NOTE: group 'G' does not mean non-hazardous, just non-reactive! Cadmium, a very hazardous material is in Group G.

As of this writing, we have over 3500 bottles of chemicals. Needless to say this is a major pain to inventory each year. But for safety reasons it makes sense to know what we have and are working with. As an added benefit, having the inventory on disk means that when you need a few grams of a substance not in your lab, you can check the inventory and go to the lab that has some on hand.

Please include gas cylinders & aerosol cans on inventory

Example chemical list from a life safety box

NAME Unit Amount SG Hazards
AMMONIUM THIOSULFATE, 60% GALS 1.00 G 10,12
ARROWROOT POWDER (STARCH) LBS 0.50 G 11
BALANCED ALKALI LBS 1.00 G 10,12
BENZOTRIAZOLE G 4.50 G 10,12,28,37,38
BORAX LBS 1.00 G 10,12,15,28,38,34,37
BROMOCRESOL PURPLE G 10.00 G 10,17,28,37,38
CHLORODIFLUOROMETHANE G 142.00 J 1,12,15,17,21,30,56

On the first chemical, ammonium thiosulfate, 60%
   the storage group is listed as "G", which means non-reactive (but not necessarily non-hazardous)
   and the hazards decoded from the hazard code guide are "10" = other and "12" = slight poison.

In this way you can look up the hazards of a chemical in the lab where you are working.

CHEMICAL STORAGE Proper chemical storage addresses the following concerns:

  • Management - know what and where the chemicals you need are located.

  • Risk - know the hazards of the materials you are using.

  • Mixing - prevent mixing to produce a more dangerous compound.

  • Exposure - prevent workers & visitors from unnecessary exposure.

Do not keep more on hand than you need in a reasonable period of time.

Flammables CANNOT be stored in a refrigerator
unless it is specifically designed for flammable storage.
***** This means Ethanol too! *****

Only cleaning materials under sinks.

Sinks will leak at some point, reacting to or spreading the materials underneath.
Use appropriate small tubs to keep incompatible materials away from each other.

no gravity feed containers with haz mat!

NO FLAMMABLE materials in gravity feed containers.

They will leak at some point.